Watch Dr Matfield's 'welcome' video

 

Dr Mark Matfield is AICR’s Scientific Co-ordinator…

“I’ve enjoyed the great privilege of being AICR’s Scientific Co-ordinator for 11 years. I continue to have a great faith in the rigorous way that AICR assesses and funds research – no matter what the type of cancer or where in the world it’s taking place. Cancer is a worldwide problem, and together we must look to world-class research for the answers that will help us beat it.

I understand how worrying and confusing a prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment can be, whether it affects you or someone close to you. If you have a question about risk factors, testing or diagnosis, treatments or any area of prostate cancer research currently being funded by AICR, I hope I can help. I’m here to share what I know about prostate cancer with as many of you as I can. And, obviously, anything you wish to ask will be treated in confidence and I will reply to you by email.”

Dr Mark Matfield

Meet the world's finest minds

As AICR’s Scientific Co-ordinator, Dr Mark Matfield receives progress reports from AICR-funded scientists all over the world. Here you can watch some of these video updates from the world of prostate cancer research, giving you a fascinating insight into the vital work we are funding and what drives the scientists at the forefront of cancer research.

Dr Justin Sturge, Imperial College London, England
Dr Justin Sturge talks about his AICR - funded prostate cancer research project.
Predicting whether prostate cancer will spread

Advanced prostate cancer often spreads to the skeleton where it causes severe pain and the weakening of bones, leading to fractures and other problems. Dr Sturge has found increased levels of a protein, called Endo180, in the type of cancer that can move from the prostate gland to the bone. This suggests that it could be used for predicting if prostate cancer might spread. Endo180 could also be involved in the spreading process itself, so blocking its activity may help prevent prostate cancer moving to the bone. With his AICR grant Dr Sturge is studying how targeting Endo180 may help prevent the spreading process.


Meet the world's finest minds

Predicting whether prostate cancer will spread

Advanced prostate cancer often spreads to the skeleton where it causes severe pain and the weakening of bones, leading to fractures and other problems. Dr Sturge has found increased levels of a protein, called Endo180, in the type of cancer that can move from the prostate gland to the bone. This suggests that it could be used for predicting if prostate cancer might spread. Endo180 could also be involved in the spreading process itself, so blocking its activity may help prevent prostate cancer moving to the bone. With his AICR grant Dr Sturge is studying how targeting Endo180 may help prevent the spreading process.



 

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